2.5.1. 1417 bis 1526

1417-1423. King Sigismund of Hungary issues safe-conduct orders at Spis Castle for travelling Roma.

1427. Hundreds of Roma arrive at the gates of Paris. The city sends them on to the town of Pontoise in less than a month.

1445. Prince Vlad Dracul of Wallachia transports some 12,000 persons "who looked like Egyptians" from Bulgaria for slave labour.

1471. The first anti-Gypsy laws are passed in Lucerne, Switzerland. 17,000 Roma are transported into Moldavia by Stephan the Great for slave labour.

1472. Duke Friedrich of the Rhine Palatinate asks his people to help Roma pilgrims.

1476 and 1487. King Matthias of Slovakia issues safe-conduct orders for travelling Roma.

1482. The first anti-Gypsy laws are passed in state of Brandenburg.

1492 and 1496. King Vladislav of Slovakia issues safe-conduct orders for travelling Roma.

1492. The first anti-Gypsy laws are passed in Spain.

1493. Roma are expelled from Milan.

1496-1498. The Reichstag (parliament) in Landau and Freiburg declares Roma traitors to the Christian countries, spies in the pay of the Turks, and carriers of the plague.

1498. Four Gypsies accompany Christopher Columbus on his third voyage to the New World.

1500. At the request of Maximilian I, the Augsburg Reichstag declares Roma traitors to the Christian countries, and accuses them of witchcraft, kidnapping of children, and banditry.
c. 1500. Gitano influence on Andalusian flamenco song and dance begins. Although flamenco is not a Gitano invention, the art of flamenco later becomes forever associated with the Gitanos from the 19th century onwards.

1501. Roma are recorded in Russia.

1504. Roma are prohibited by Louis XII from living in France. The punishment is banishment.

1505. Roma are recorded in Scotland, probably from Spain.

1510. Roma are prohibited by the Grand Council of France from residence. The punishment is banishment. A second offence results in hanging.

1512. Roma are first recorded in Sweden on 29 September. A company of about 30 families, lead by a "Count Anthonius" arrives in Stockholm, claiming that they came from "Little Egypt". They are welcomed by the city and given lodging and money for their stay. A few years later, King Gustav Vasa (1521-1560), suspects that the Roma are spies and orders that they be driven out from the country.
Roma are expelled from Catalonia.

1523. Prague officially allows nomads to remain. The welcome does not last long.

1525. Charles V issues an edict in Holland ordering all those that call themselves Egyptians to leave the country within two days.

1526. The first anti-Gypsy laws are passed in Holland and Portugal.

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